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Slaughter for Small Groups

Slaughter for Small Groups

Provide proper fitting restraint

Sheep and goats require equipment designed to fit their smaller bodies. Frequently they are handled and slaughtered in equipment designed for cattle 10 times their size. This is not only inefficient but unsafe for the animals and workers. Goats are especially talented at slipping through or under cattle equipment and giving employees a chase. Sizing equipment to the appropriate dimensions is key.

Calm, controlled approach whether a crowd pen or a chute

Generally, the most calming entrance to the processing room and to the slaughter restraint is a chute with solid sides that prevent stressful distractions and keep both workers and animals secure and safe. The chute floor should be a non-slip surface that is clear of supports or protruding edges that could cause stumbling or injury.

The entrance to the restraint should be similar to the chute, and the animal should enter willingly, without prodding. Any motion of the restraint should be quiet and keep the animals secure. In most cases restraining the animal in an upright, comfortable position before slaughter is preferred. The device needs to apply sufficient pressure to provide the sensation of being securely held, but not excessive pressure that would cause pain or discomfort.

The success of humane slaughter is dependent on good animal handling so animals are slaughtered in an unstressed state. Sheep and goats have specific behavior characteristics, which must be taken into consideration when they are being moved.

Lamb in homemade restraint

Provide the correct restraint. Generally, the most calming entrance to the processing room and to the slaughter restraint is a chute with solid sides that prevent stressful distractions and keep both workers and animals secure and safe. The chute floor should be a non-slip surface that is clear of supports or protruding edges that could cause stumbling or injury.

The entrance to the restraint should be similar to the chute, and the animal should enter willingly, without prodding. Any motion of the restraint should be quiet and keep the animals secure. In most cases restraining the animal in an upright, comfortable position before slaughter is preferred.

The device needs to apply sufficient pressure to provide the sensation of being securely held, but not excessive pressure that would cause pain or discomfort.

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