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7 Reasons to Eat Grass-Fed Meat

We are often asked about the health benefits of grass-fed meat. One of the resources we find useful is the Eat Wild  website. This is a great source for research-based information on the benefits of not only grass fed meat but of eggs and dairy products. Our 7 Research-based Reasons list is adapted from a USDA and Clemson University, SC (2009) joint study (S.K. Duckett et al, Journal of Animal Science, June 2009).  A similar, longer version of this list can be found on the Eat Wild Health Benefits topic.

 

  1. Higher in beta-carotene: Pasture-fed ruminants may have 7 times the concentration of beta-carotene (precursor of Vitamin A) than grain-fed. Vitamin A is important for many body functions including vision, bone growth, cell division and the immune function.
  2. Higher in vitamin E (alpha-tocopherol): Pasture-fed ruminants may have 4 times the vitamin E than grain-fed. Vitamin E has been associated with a lower risk of heart disease and cancer.
  3. Higher in the B-vitamins thiamin and riboflavin: These Vitamins are important to maintain and support energy, nerves and muscles.
  4. Higher in the minerals calcium, magnesium, and potassium: These minerals are important to maintain bones, nerves and muscles and helps blood to clot. Potassium helps lower the risk for high blood pressure.
  5. Higher in total Omega 3’s: Omega 3’s reduce inflammation, lowers the amount of serum cholesterol and triglycerides, prevents excess clotting and is thought to reduce the risk of cancer.
  6. Higher in conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) and vaccenic acid: CLA is thought to reduce cancer, high blood pressure, cardiovascular disease, osteoporosis and insulin resistance diabetes. Vaccenic acid protects against atherosclerosis, a contributing factor in cardiovascular disease.
  7. Lower in the saturated fats linked with heart disease. Saturated fats (e.g., cholesterol, triglycerides and low-density lipoproteins) have been shown to play a significant role in heart disease and stroke.

 

For more interesting research and general information on health benefits explore the Eat Wild website.